Which Dodge Vehicles Have Dangerous Takata Airbags?

Key Points

  • The Takata airbag recall is the largest automotive recall in U.S. history with more than 100 million vehicles affected worldwide.
  • The inflators become unstable over time and can rupture / explode during an airbag deployment, shooting metal fragments into the cabin.
  • The problem is responsible for at least 27 deaths worldwide.
A crash test dummy about to hit an airbag superimposed with the Takata logo
Posted on
Author
Scott McCracken
Tagged
#airbags-and-seat-belts #recall

The propellent inside the inflators is unstable. During an airbag deployment the explodes with such force that it rips the inflators into metal fragments, shooting them in the direction of vehicle occupants along with the airbag itself.

Because of their instability, the airbags are turning low speed crashes into very dangerous situations.

After years of recalls, Fiat-Chrysler announced they were entering the fourth and final stage of Takata campaigns in January 2019.

Which Dodge Vehicles Have Been Recalled?

What are Zones?

Some Takata recalls are being broken down into what NHTSA calls "zones". A zone is a group of states and territories where a vehicle was originally sold or registered at some point in time. A few notes about zones:

  1. A vehicle can be recalled in more than one zone.
  2. When no zone is defined, the recall was more widespread. Possibly internationally.
  3. If you find this all very confusing, you're not alone my friend.

So, here we go:

  • Zone A: Alabama, California, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, Texas, Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands (Saipan) and the U.S. Virgin Islands.
  • Zone B: Arizona, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia.
  • Zone C: Alaska, Colorado, Connecticut, Idaho, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, New York, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Utah, Vermont, Washington, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

Take Action

Takata inflators have been [linked to 11 deaths][2] in the USA, so far.

Owners of these vehicles are urged to call the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) safety hotline at 1-888-327-4236 or [lookup your VIN][3] (vehicle identification number).

"Consumers that are uncertain whether their vehicle is impacted by the Takata recalls, or any other recall, can contact their manufacturer’s website to search, by their vehicle identification number (VIN) to confirm whether their individual vehicle has an open recall that needs to be addressed."

Generations Where This Problem Has Been Reported

This problem has popped up in the following Dodge generations.

Most years within a generation share the same parts and manufacturing process. You can also expect them to share the same problems. So while it may not be a problem in every year yet, it's worth looking out for.

  1. 3rd Generation Challenger

    Years
    2008–2021
    Reliability
    26th of 54
    PainRank
    7.18
    Complaints
    264
    Continue Front 3/4 view of a Challenger
  2. 6th Generation Charger

    Years
    2006–2010
    Reliability
    48th of 54
    PainRank
    27.35
    Complaints
    443
    Continue Front 3/4 view of a Charger
  3. 3rd Generation Dakota

    Years
    2005–2011
    Reliability
    28th of 54
    PainRank
    10.29
    Complaints
    223
    Continue
  4. 2nd Generation Durango

    Years
    2004–2009
    Reliability
    44th of 54
    PainRank
    22.05
    Complaints
    829
    Continue Front 3/4 view of a Durango
  5. 1st Generation Magnum

    Years
    2005–2008
    Reliability
    38th of 54
    PainRank
    19.1
    Complaints
    273
    Continue Front 3/4 view of a Magnum
  6. 3rd Generation Ram 1500

    Years
    2002–2008
    Reliability
    52nd of 54
    PainRank
    57.14
    Complaints
    3501
    Continue Front 3/4 view of a Ram 1500
  7. 3rd Generation Ram 2500

    Years
    2003–2009
    Reliability
    41st of 54
    PainRank
    20.39
    Complaints
    827
    Continue Front 3/4 view of a Ram 2500
  8. 3rd Generation Ram 3500

    Years
    2003–2009
    Reliability
    39th of 54
    PainRank
    19.54
    Complaints
    358
    Continue Front 3/4 view of a Ram 3500
  9. 4th Generation Ram 4500

    Years
    2008–2011
    Reliability
    1st of 54
    PainRank
    0.22
    Complaints
    3
    Continue
  10. 4th Generation Ram 5500

    Years
    2008–2011
    Reliability
    10th of 54
    PainRank
    0.6
    Complaints
    3
    Continue
  11. 1st Generation Sprinter

    Years
    2004–2009
    Reliability
    3rd of 54
    PainRank
    0.3
    Complaints
    8
    Continue Front 3/4 view of a Sprinter

Further Reading

A timeline of stories related to this problem. We try to boil these stories down to the most important bits so you can quickly see where things stand. Interested in getting these stories in an email? Signup for free email alerts for your vehicle over at CarComplaints.com.

  1. J

    ust a few days after switching its name, FCA US is issuing a massive recall for 3.3 million older vehicles with Takata airbag inflators.** The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has been not-so-subtly suggesting automakers ditch regional recalls and expand nationwide. It looks like FCA US has listened.

    FCA US says it's aware of one injury related to exploding Takata airbag inflators, but that incident occurred in Florida. The automaker said there have been no other reports of accidents or injuries. In addition, FCA US says over 1,000 laboratory tests have been conducted on airbag inflators but no problems were discovered.

    The recalled vehicles include the 2004-2007 Dodge Ram 1500 / 2500 / 3500 / 3500 Chassis Cab, Durango, Charger, Magnum, and Dakota.

    keep reading
  2. Dodge is part of a new recall of Takata airbag inflators in over 350,000 vehicles.

    The recall is currently limited to areas of high humidity, including Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Louisiana, Mississippi, Texas and the territories of American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, Saipan and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

    Chrysler says the vehicles have passenger frontal airbag inflators that are different from other metal Takata inflators used by other automakers. Chrysler says it has received no reports of accidents or injuries and even after laboratory tests on 600 inflators, none of the inflators were defective.

    Recall notices should be sent out around January 15th of next year.

    keep reading

OK, Now What?

Maybe you've experienced this problem. Maybe you're concerned you will soon. Whatever the reason, here's a handful of things you can do to make sure it gets the attention it deserves.

  1. File Your Complaint

    CarComplaints.com is a free site dedicated to uncovering problem trends and informing owners about potential issues with their cars. Major class action law firms use this data when researching cases.

    Add a Complaint
  2. Notify CAS

    The Center for Auto Safety (CAS) is a pro-consumer organization that researches auto safety issues & often compels the US government to do the right thing through lobbying & lawsuits.

    Notify The CAS
  3. Report a Safety Concern

    The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is the US agency with the authority to conduct vehicle defect investigations & force recalls. Their focus is on safety-related issues.

    Report to NHTSA